Nowadays DECEMBER TWO THOUSAND FIFTEEN Δεκεμβρίου του δύο χιλιάδες δεκάτης πέμπτης to complete the resume for the surnames found as concept internal KARATOFENE ATHENA Santo Antonio Remedy against malaria extract of quinine chinino , than with last word REMA I am using the H contented , KARATOFENE ΑΘΗΝΑ almost certain to transport that various mean about the circle to enclose itself, it relative a several temporal passages happened at the family of my Father Aièllo Αίεΐΐο ΑίθΙΙο Francèsco Φραντσέσκο Frantsésko

Nowadays DECEMBER TWO THOUSAND FIFTEEN Δεκεμβρίου του δύο χιλιάδες δεκάτης πέμπτης  to complete the resume for the surnames found as concept internal KARATOFENE ATHENA Santo Antonio Remedy against malaria extract of quinine chinino , than with last word REMA I am using  the H contented , KARATOFENE ΑΘΗΝΑ almost certain to transport that various mean about the circle to enclose itself, it relative a several temporal passages happened at the family of my Father Aièllo Αίεΐΐο ΑίθΙΙο Francèsco Φραντσέσκο Frantsésko, here to report the same vicissitudes in sinus the eponymous extrapolated from the evident suggestions appeared to be named instances concerning the evolve itself of the treated exposition leading the crowing develop itself of the intangible purpose insert between the vanishing determinate itself of the surnames about it contented which deposing the verified conjunctions resulting as passages almost obliged than to conserve the necessary stigma at record innumerable epithets , which  flowing inside the surnames about peoples in contact with my Father Family, they  as employers or workers with the others mansions, than my father family was most important royal family

AIÈLLO OVEN Oven OFEN MARÌA LUISA ÓLYMPIA Ólimpia ANTONIÈTTA Αίεΐΐο ΑίθΙΙο Φούρνος κλίβανος Ofen Μαρία Λουίζα Ολυμπίας Αντονιέτα PERSIAN ماریا لویزا المپیا آنتونیتا اجاق گاز مایکروفر (مایکروویو) Aieiio ایلو Ofen ماریا لوییزا المپیا آنتونیتا מ ایلو جوجه OFEN

Hebrew  אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטהאנטונייטהאנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה  אנטונייטה אנטונייטה
Σήμερα για να ολοκληρωθεί η βιογραφικό για τα επώνυμα βρεθεί ως έννοιας της εσωτερικής KARATOFENE ΑΘΗΝΑ Σάντο Αντόνιο ενδίκου βοηθήματος κατά την ελονοσία εκχυλίσματα κινίνης chinino, από τα με την τελευταία λέξη για REMA Είμαι χρησιμοποιώντας το το H ευχαρίστηση, καράτια OFENE ΑΘΗΝΑ σχεδόν βέβαιο ότι για τη μεταφορά διαφόρων μέση περίπου του κύκλου στον εαυτό επισυνάψουν, το σχετικό μια αρκετά περάσματα χρονική συνέβη στην οικογένεια του πατέρα μου AIELLO Αίεΐΐο ΑίθΙΙο Francesco Φραντσέσκο Frantsésko,
εδώ για αναφέρουν τα ίδια μεταπτώσεις σε φλεβοκομβικό είναι επώνυμος παρέκταση από εμφανών προτάσεις φάνηκε να είναι ονομάστηκε περιπτώσεις που αφορούν στην εξέλιξη της ίδιας της κατεργασμένης εγχειρίδιο λειτουργίας που οδηγεί το λάλημα την ανάπτυξη της ίδιας της ένθετης αλληλουχίας των άυλων σκοπό ανάμεσα στην φυγής καθορισμένος η ίδια από τα επώνυμα γι ‘αυτό ευχαριστημένος οποία καθαίρεσαν των επαληθευθεί συζεύξεων της που προκύπτουν ως διελεύσεις σχεδόν υποχρεωμένος από το να διατηρηθεί το απαραίτητο στίγματος που ρεκόρ αμέτρητους επίθετα, που ρέει μέσα από τα επώνυμα γύρω από τους λαούς σε επαφή με τον πατέρα οικογένειά μου που ως εργοδοτικές ή οι εργαζόμενοι με τους άλλους αρχοντικά σπίτια, από οικογενειακές του πατέρα μου ήταν πιο σημαντικό βασιλικής οικογένειας

konkani_cons

AIÈLLO OVEN Oven OFEN MARÌA LUISA ÓLYMPIA Ólimpia ANTONIÈTTA Αίεΐΐο ΑίθΙΙο Φούρνος κλίβανος Ofen Μαρία Λουίζα Ολυμπίας Αντονιέτα PERSIAN ماریا لویزا المپیا آنتونیتا اجاق گاز مایکروفر (مایکروویو) Aieiio ایلو Ofen ماریا لوییزا المپیا آنتونیتا מ ایلو جوجه OFEN

Hebrew  אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטהאנטונייטהאנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה אנטונייטה  אנטונייטה אנטונייטה

First draft only who to should finish Last name: Kall this interesting surname has three possible origins. Firstly, it may be a pet form of the personal name “Nicholas”, itself coming from the Greek “Nikolaos”, from “nikan” meaning to conquer, plus “laos”, people. Inside Karatofene Athena the surnames

Last name: Kettoe

Recorded as Kitto, Kittoe, Kittow and occasionally as Kettoe, Kettow, and Kettowe, this is an English and Cornish surname. It is a localised diminutive development of the medieval Crusader name Christopher, though the short form of Kitt. Christopher from the Ancient Greek ‘Kristoperos’ Ο Χριστόφορος is believed to translate as the ‘bearer of Christ’ «κομιστή Χριστό» and was the name of a martyd 3rd century saint. The fable attached to the name is that the future St Christopher Άγιος Χριστόφορος carried the infant Christ across a swollen river

Kettoe

Klosa

One of the most famous of all surnames of Germanic origins, and recorded in some fifty spelling ranging from Klaus, Kloss and Koilas, to Kollatsch, Kulik and Clausen, this is a shortform or nickname. It derives from the ancient Greek name “Nikolaos”, «Νικόλαος» which as a surname is perhaps even more popular than Klaus Κλάους! Either way the name translates as “The conquering people”, a theme which no doubt contributed to its huge popularity.

Last name: Khoter

This is apparently a surname of Germanic origins. Always rare, it appears to be recorded as Khoter, Khotler, Khotsch, Khortz and Khotz, suggesting a transposed spelling origin from the personal names of Kort, Kurt, Kortz, or Kurtz. In the dark Ages from about the 5th to the 9th century, roughly after the fall of the Roman Empire in about 420 a.d. to the coming of the Emperor Charlemagne, these were originally baptismal names of endearment, and later in medieval times, nicknames and then surnames. If this hypothosis is correct, the word and hence the name means short, small, or little, and would have been applied either as a nickname for a small person

Epónymo Last name: Keston

This unusual and interesting name is a variant of the (personal) name “Christian”, an Olde French name introduced into England following the Norman Conquest of 1066, especially by the Breton settlers. The male personal name was derived from the Latin “Christianus”, meaning “follower of Christ”, from Latin “Christus”, after the Greek “Khristos”,  « Christós »«Χρηστός» a derivative of “Kriein”, to anoint.

Keston

Last name: Kall

this interesting surname has three possible origins. Firstly, it may be a pet form of the personal name “Nicholas”, itself coming from the Greek “Nikolaos”, from “nikan” meaning to conquer, plus “laos”, people.

Secondly, it may be from a Middle English personal name derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century “Cola”, from “col” meaning (char)coal, presumably denoting someone of swarthy appearance, synonymous with the Old Norse given name “Koli”

may be of Scottish and Irish origin, and an anglicized form of the Gaelic “Mac Gill Chomhghaill” (Scotland), or “Mac Giolla Chomhghaill” in Irish, both meaning “the son of the servant of (St.) Comhghall”.

KALL

Last name: Allatt

This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, from a personal name which traces its origin to two names recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086; “Ailiet” and “Aliet”. Deriving ultimately from the Olde English pre 7th Century “Aeoelgyo” and “Aeoelgeat”, they break down to mean in the first instance, “noble combat” (“aoel”, noble, and “gyo”, battle), and secondly, “noble great” (“aoel”, noble, and “gait”, goat), which is a masculine form of an old tribal name.

Allatt Allnatt Allott Allso Attle Attoe Atton
Last name: Allnatt

This unusual name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and derives from a combination the Olde English pre 7th Century personal names “Aethelnoth”, “Aelfnoth”, and “Ealhnoth”. These are all variants of the name “Athelnoth”, which is composed of the Olde English elements “athel”, noble and “noth”, daring.

Last name: Allott

This interesting surname derives from the Middle English and Old French female given name “Allot, Aalot”, pet forms of “Alis”, itself a contraction of the Germanic personal name “Adalhaid(is)”, composed of the elements “adal”, noble, and “haid”, kind, sort. The name has an honourable history, being used initially as a royal title for German princesses in the same manner as “Augusta” was bestowed on the wives and daughters of Roman emperors. It was also the name borne by the wife of the emperor Otto the Great. “Adalhaidis” passed through the stages “Adelice” or “Adelica”, and by about the 12th Century had been shortened to “Alicia”, whence “Alice, Alis”, and its hypocorisms “Allot(t)” and “Aalot”. “Alote”

Last name: Allso

This unusual surname, also found recorded in the spellings of Also, Allsoe, Alsoe and the extraordinary Allsow (see below), is locational, and derives either from the “lost” Derbyshire village of Allsobrook, or the village of Alsop, in both cases the “modern” surname being a dialectal short form. The name would appear to translate as “the valley (hop) of Aelle”, from the pre 10th Century Olde English, with “Aelle” being an early baptismal name, not uncommon in the North Midlands.

Last name: Attle

This most interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a topographical name for someone who lived near a meadow, pasture or patch of arable land, from the Olde English pre 7th Century “aet”, Middle English “atte”, meaning “at” with the Olde English “leah”, Middle English “lee”, wood, clearing in a wood. Hence, Atlay has retained the preposition “aet” which has, down through the ages, been fused to the second element, as in the case of the names Byfield, Uphill, Underdown, and many more. The surname is also found in the modern idiom as At(t)lee, Atley and Attle.

Last name: Attoe

This unusual and long-established surname is of medieval English origin, and is a topographical name from residence by the spur of a hill or ridge. The derivation is from the Middle English “at”, and “hoe” (Olde English pre 7th Century “hoh”), heel, projecting ridge of land, steep ridge. Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages.

Last name: Atton

Recorded as Hatten, Hatton, Atten and Atton, this is either an English or an Irish surname. If English it originates from any of the various places called Hatton in the counties of Cheshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, and Warwickshire. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th century word “hoed” meaning heathland and “tun”, a farm or settlement. As a surname it was generally given to people who left their original Hatton village, and moved elsewhere. The easiest form of identification being to call people by the name of the place from whence they came.

Last name: Kaas

Recorded in many spellings throughout Europe ranging from the English Cheese, Cheeseman, Chesman, and Chisman or Chismon, to Kasmann and Kaser (Germany), Caesman (Flanders), Casari and Casiero (Italy), and Casier and Chasier (France), this is an occupational surname for a cheesemaker. As such it is or was, one of the most imnportant of the early medieval surnames. The original derivation is from the pre 7th century Anglo- Saxon and Old English ‘cese’ meaning cheese, but ultimately from the Roman (Latin) ‘caseus’.

Last name: Kaemena Germanic-Polish surname “Kemena”

Kaemena is an unusual spelling of the , itself a variant form of the ancient “Kamien”. This is essentially a Polish word meaning “stone” and in the surname context is either habitational for one who dwelt at a house built of stone or one with a stone fireplace, or maybe a locational name for a former inhabitant of a town such as Kamienic in Silesia.

Last name: Kalf

This interesting surname derives from the Old Norse personal name “Kalfr”, originally a byname meaning “Calf”, or possibly from the Old English pre 7th Century “calf”, Anglian form of “cealf” meaning “calf”, used either as a nickname or as a metonymic occupational name for someone who was responsible for tending calves. The surname with several variant spellings including Calf, Calfe, Callf and the Germanic Kalb and Kelberer, dates back to the mid 12th Century

Last name: Katz

Recorded in many forms including Katz, Katzmann, Katzel, and locational compounds such as Katzberg, Katzberger, Katzbach, Katzenbach, Katzenmeir, Katzenschwanz, Katzensteig and others, this is a ancient German surname. It may also be Askenasic, although the origin is the same. The base form as Katz derives from a fused form or acronym of “kohen tsedek” meaning a priest, or literally a priest of righteousness! It has also been suggested that the name may derive from the word “katsin” meaning “the rich one”, which given the robust humour of the medieval period when the surname was first recorded, does not seem an unreasonable explanation.

Last name: Kanter

Recorded in many spelling forms including Canter, Cantor, Caunter (English), Kanter, Kanther, and Kantor (German, Austrian and Hungarian), Chaunter and Chanson (France), and others, this interesting surname is occupational. It describes a singer or chorister, and derives from the pre 10th century Frankish word “chantroir” meaning “enchanter or magician”. As the name is unlikely to have applied to a monk or churchman, since they were officially at least, celibate, the name is more closely associated with the travelling theatres of the medieval times, who employed many singers and artists

Last name: Karran

This famous Manx (Isle of Man) surname has no connection with the more usual spelling of “Crane”, which is of Anglo-Saxon origins, other than that they are both in a sense nicknames. The Manx “Crain” derives from the Old Gaelic ‘Mac Ciarain’, which translates as ‘the son of Little Kieran’, with Kieran itself meaning ‘the dark coloured one. Probably half of all Isle of Man surnames are of Gaelic, and mainly Scottish origins

Kaas Kanter KARRAN KATT

This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is an example of the sizeable group of early European surnames that were gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames. The nicknames were given in the first instance with reference to occupation or to a variety of features, such as physical attributes or peculiarities, mental and moral characteristics, including supposed resemblance to an animal’s or bird’s appearance or disposition, or to habits of dress. In this instance, the surname derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century “catte”, Old Norman-French “cat”, cat, and the nickname would have been given to someone thought to bear a fancied resemblance to a cat. Occasionally, the surname may be from a medieval female given name, a pet form of “Catlin”, the Anglo-Norman French form of “Catherine”, from the Greek “katharos”, pure

Last name: Kean

katz KEAN

Last name: Kear or Keer

This unusual and interesting name, with the variant spellings Keer and Care, is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is an occupational surname meaning a key-smith, a maker of keys. The name is derived from the Old English pre 7th Century word “Caegere”, key-smith, from “caeg”, key, with the agent suffix “er”. The first recording of the name occurs in the Northumberland Pipe Rolls of 1178, as a type of personal name where one Adam filius Cheigher (meaning “Adam, son of the key-smith”) is recorded

Last name: Kearn

Recorded in the spellings of Kearn, Kern, Kerne,Kerner, Kernes, and Kearns, this is a surname of multiple national origins. Confusingly it can be German, or English-Cornish, and sometimes Irish. Equally it has multiple meanings and derivations. If German and hence Anglo-Saxon (English) it probably derives from the pre 7th century word “gern” meaning desire, and usually found in the early personal names “Gernwin and Kernwin”. However the surname can also be locational from the town of Kern in Germany. If Irish and possibly Cornish, the derivation is from the pre 10th century Gaelic personal name “Ceirin” which translates as “The little black one”. As such it was a name given to the first chief of the clan, who was presumably dark haired or of dark complexion. Early examples of the surname recording taken from authentic charters of the medieval period include: Hainrich Kerne of Runstall near Villingen, Germany, in 1255, and Johannes Kerner of Markdorf, in 1276. A family called Kerne have been recorded in Truro, Cornwall, since at least the 16th century, whilst in Ireland the clan were in about the year 1420, in possession of the greater part of the present barony of Costello in County Mayo. An inquisition of 1609 describes them as erenaghs or hereditary holders of church property, of Killaghtee in the diocese of Raphoe, and in the census of 1659 they are also located in County Sligo. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop,” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling

Last name: Keat

This interesting surname has two possible origins. Firstly, the surname may be of English topographical origin deriving from the old English pre 7th Century “cyte” meaning a hut, or some kind of shed or outhouse for cattle or sheep; hence “dweller by the hut”. One, Ralph atte Kete, is registered in the “Place Names of Kent” in 1292. The second possibility is as a nickname for a fierce or wild person deriving from the Middle English “kete” (old English “Cyta”) meaning kite, the bird of prey; hence “wild as a Kite”. Clearly the name was considered to be complimentary as otherwise it is difficult to account for its popularity.

Kear Kearn Keat

Last name: Keen

This interesting surname may derive from a number of possible origins. Firstly, the name may be of Anglo-Saxon origin, as a nickname for a brave or proud person, from the Olde English pre 7th Century “cene”, Middle English “kene”, fierce, brave, proud. However, Keen may perhaps have originated from the Middle English personal name “Kene”, a short form of any of the various Olde English personal names with the first lement “cene” or “cyne”, royal, from “cyning”, chieftain, king. Finally, the surname may be a variant of “Keane”, of Old Gaelic origin, and the Anglicized form of the Gaelic “O’Cathain”, the male descendant of Cathan, a personal name from “cath”, battle; this sept were located in West Clare. In the modern idiom the surname can be found recorded as Keen, Keene, Keenes and Keens. The surname was first recorded in the early 13th Century (see below), and other early recordings include: Hugo Kene (Worcestershire, 1221), and Richard le Kene (Oxfordshire, 1297). Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Dorothy Keen, was christened on September 3rd 1635, at St. Dunstan in the East, London. Sir Benjamin Keene (1697 – 1757) was the British ambassador in Madrid (1727, and 1748 – 1757), and negotiated the treaty of Seville in 1729.

Kenn

Last name: Keenor

This rare and interesting surname, recorded as Keener and Keenor, is believed to be of late medieval English origins. It is said to be either locational or residential, probably being from a now “lost” medieval village in the ancient county of Devonshire. It is believed that this lost village, of which there are over five thousand examples in the British Isles, was called Kyner or Kinner, but this is not certain. Today there are still two village in Devonshire called “Kenn”, and it is also possible that the surname holders may derive from these, the suffix “er” being used in medieval times to denote somebody who lived or worked at a particular place.

Keenor

Last name: Kroon

This famous Spanish and Italian surname is of unknown etymology. The name appears in many spellings and in a number of countries, these forms include Corona, Coronas, Coronado, Couronne (French), Krone (German), Krona, Kroon (Scandanavian), Kroin and Krojn (Polish). The translation is ‘the crown’ but why anybody should be so named is far from clear. Most dictionaries of surnames describe it as either a habitational name for somebody who lived at a house or perhaps an inn with the sign of a crown, or had their head shaved in accordance with some religious belief. In that respect it could also have been a nickname for one was going bald, and whose ‘crown’ showed through his hair, whilst a further explanation is that the name was a metonymic job descriptive for a maker of helmets or hats.

Kroon

Last name: Klaessen

One of the most famous of all surnames of Germanic origins, and recorded in some fifty spelling ranging from Klaus, Kloss and Koilas, to Kollatsch, Kulik and Clausen, this is a shortform or nickname. It derives from the ancient Greek name “Nikolaos”, which as a surname is perhaps even more popular than Klaus! Either way the name translates as “The conquering people”, a theme which no doubt contributed to its huge popularity. The Great Crusades to supposedly free the Holy Land and particularly Jerusalem, from the Saracens, in the 11th and 12th century, lead to a further boost for Klaus and its derivatives. It was the fashion for returning crusaders and pilgrims to call their children by early biblical or hebrew names, or names associated with Ancient Greece. It was from Greece that most of the crusades were launched.

Klaessen

Last name: Ketton

This is an English locational surname, although the place of origin is uncertain. The surname is recorded in the modern spellings as Keaton, Keeton, and Ketton, and it is probable that the name does derive from a village called ‘Ketton’ in the former county of Rutland. This in itself makes it rare, Rutland being for seven centuries the smallest English county until destroyed in 1974, and the ‘home’ of very few authentic surnames. ‘Ketton’ village was recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as ‘Chetene’, although the meaning is open to dispute. It is probably some form of ‘Chater’, the local river being so named. There are two other minor claimants to this surname, or at least to some of its nameholders.

Ketton

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